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Harriet Tubman Day

On this day in 1913, American abolitionist and leading conductor in the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York. An escaped slave herself, Tubman took great personal risks […]

Recurring

Harriet Tubman Day

On this day in 1913, American abolitionist and leading conductor in the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York. An escaped slave herself, Tubman took great personal risks […]

Recurring

On August 6, 1848, Susie King Taylor, a nurse, educator, and author, and the first and only black woman to publish her recollections of the Civil War, was born in Liberty County, Georgia

On August 6, 1848, Susie King Taylor, a nurse, educator, and author, and the first and only black woman to publish her recollections of the Civil War, was born in Liberty County, Georgia. Taylor’s book, Reminiscences of My Life in Camp, vividly described her experiences teaching and nursing the 33rd U.S. Colored Infantry during the […]

Recurring

On October 18, 1773, American poet Phillis Wheatley gained her freedom

On October 18, 1773, American poet Phillis Wheatley gained her freedom. She was the first Black American woman to publish a book of poetry, and, despite her time spent enslaved, was a well-known poet throughout England and the American colonies. Her poetry often touched on themes of religion and death, with much of her language […]

Recurring

Harriet Tubman Day

On this day in 1913, American abolitionist and leading conductor in the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York. An escaped slave herself, Tubman took great personal risks to lead at least 70 slaves out of the South to freedom – she never lost a passenger. Did you know? Aside from her work […]

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On May 22, 1856, Congressman Preston Brooks severely beats Senator Charles Sumner in the Senate chamber after Sumner made a speech against slavery and its expansion

On May 22, 1856, Congressman Preston Brooks severely beats Senator Charles Sumner in the Senate chamber after Sumner made a speech against slavery and its expansion. The incident reflected breaking tensions between North and South over slavery, as many northerners rallied in protest while southern newspapers praised Brooks. Though he suffered from brain injuries and post-traumatic […]

Recurring

On August 6, 1848, Susie King Taylor, a nurse, educator, and author, and the first and only black woman to publish her recollections of the Civil War, was born in Liberty County, Georgia

On August 6, 1848, Susie King Taylor, a nurse, educator, and author, and the first and only black woman to publish her recollections of the Civil War, was born in Liberty County, Georgia. Taylor’s book, Reminiscences of My Life in Camp, vividly described her experiences teaching and nursing the 33rd U.S. Colored Infantry during the […]

Recurring

On September 3, 1838, American abolitionist, reformer, and great orator Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery

On September 3, 1838, American abolitionist, reformer, and great orator Frederick Douglass escaped from slavery. He described his escape in his bestselling memoir, published just 7 years later: “It required no very vivid imagination to depict the most frightful scenes through which I should have to pass, in case I failed. The wretchedness of slavery, […]

Recurring

On October 18, 1773, American poet Phillis Wheatley gained her freedom

On October 18, 1773, American poet Phillis Wheatley gained her freedom. She was the first Black American woman to publish a book of poetry, and, despite her time spent enslaved, was a well-known poet throughout England and the American colonies. Her poetry often touched on themes of religion and death, with much of her language […]

Recurring

Harriet Tubman Day

On this day in 1913, American abolitionist and leading conductor in the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York. An escaped slave herself, Tubman took great personal risks to lead at least 70 slaves out of the South to freedom – she never lost a passenger. Did you know? Aside from her work […]

Recurring

On May 22, 1856, Congressman Preston Brooks severely beats Senator Charles Sumner in the Senate chamber after Sumner made a speech against slavery and its expansion

On May 22, 1856, Congressman Preston Brooks severely beats Senator Charles Sumner in the Senate chamber after Sumner made a speech against slavery and its expansion. The incident reflected breaking tensions between North and South over slavery, as many northerners rallied in protest while southern newspapers praised Brooks. Though he suffered from brain injuries and post-traumatic […]