University of Nebraska – Omaha “The Supreme Court Today” with Derek Webb, September 22

Event: "The Supreme Court Today" Date: Thursday, September 22, 2022 at 10am Location: Milo Bali Student Center, 201 - Nebraska Room,  6203 University Dr N, Omaha, NE 68182 This event will be presented by Derek Webb, a Senior Managing Associate at Sidley Austin, LLP in their Supreme Court and Appellate Practice Group and the Dean's Visiting Scholar at […]

University of Wisconsin – Madison “Lincoln, the Founding, and an America Worth Saving” with Lucas Morel, September 22 at 12:00 p.m.

Lincoln, the Founding, and an America Worth Saving Speaker: Lucas Morel Date: Thursday, September 22, 2022, noon Location: 3260 UW Law School About the Event “Lincoln, the Founding, and an America Worth Saving” argues that the most important influence on Lincoln’s political thought and practice is what he learned from the Declaration of Independence and […]

Christopher Newport University “The Constitution on Campus” September 22, 1:30 & 3:00pm

The Constitution on Campus  Center for American Studies Annual Conference and 15-year Anniversary Celebration Events will take place in Gaines Theater unless otherwise noted. These JMC-sponsored events are part of a conference on the Constitution on Campus and Beyond at the Center for American Studies. JMC Sponsored Events include: Date: September 22nd at 1:30 - […]

Villanova University “James Madison and the Constitution: Sometimes America is Hard to Find” with Colleen Sheehan, September 22 at 4:30 p.m.

James Madison and the Constitution: Sometimes America is Hard to Find Speaker: Dr. Colleen Sheehan Date: Thursday, September 22 at 4:30 p.m. Location: Driscoll Hall 134, Villanova University You are invited to join the Matthew J. Ryan Center for our Fall 2022 Constitution Day address on, “James Madison and the Constitution: Sometimes America is Hard […]

Texas State University “Religious Freedom, Natural Rights, and Our Forgotten Principles of Constitutional Liberty” with Vincent Phillip Muñoz, September 22

  Religious Freedom, Natural Rights, And Our Forgotten Principles Of Constitutional Liberty Date: Thursday, September 22, 2022, 7 p.m. Location: Alkek 250, Alkek Library, Texas State University What did freedom of religion mean to the Founding Fathers? Dr. Vincent Phillip Muñoz contends that the principles which informed the Founder’s understanding of “freedom” are largely absent […]

Tufts: Hobbes’s Thucydides: The Plague Narrative

On September 23, 2022, the Tufts Program in Political Thought at Tufts University will be hosting Kinch Hoekstra for a lecture on Hobbes and Thucydides. Friday, September 23, 2022 • 12:00 PM EDT Tisch Library, Special Collections, Room 103 • Tufts University Click here to learn more >>     Kinch Hoekstra is the Chancellor's […]

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On September 24, 1906, Devil’s Tower was established as a national monument

On September 24, 1906, Devil’s Tower in Wyoming was established as a national monument. An eye-catching geologic protrusion near the Black Hills, its formation dates back to the Triassic Period, 225-195 million years ago (!) ⛰⛰⛰ The monument is considered sacred by local Native American tribes, who have passed down its legends from generation to […]

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On September 26, 1774, Johnny Appleseed born in Leominster, Massachusetts

  On September 26, 1774, American folk legend Johnny Appleseed was born in Leominster, Massachusetts as John Chapman. Chapman was instrumental in easing settlers’ movement west. Contrary to popular belief, his apple seeds and orchards didn’t provide fruit so much as alcoholic cider, an essential drink at the 19th century American’s table. 🍎🍺🍏🍺🍎🍺 Did you […]

University of Colorado, Colorado Springs: “The Crisis Presidency” with Benjamin Kleinerman at 4:30pm

The Crisis Presidency  Speaker: Benjamin Kleinerman Date: Monday, September 26, 2022 4:30-5:30 pm Location: Kettle Creek Room, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs Benjamin Kleinerman is a Professor of Political Science at Baylor University. He serves as chair of the American Political Thought section of the American Political Science Association. His first book, The Discretionary President: The Promise […]

St. Olaf College “Who are We, the People? James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the American Dream” with Nicholas Buccola, September 26 at 7pm

Who are We, the People? James Baldwin, William F. Buckley Jr., and the American Dream Lecturer: Nicholas Buccola Date: Monday, September 26 at 7p.m. Location: Viking theater; St. Olaf College In this talk, Nicholas Buccola will use the Constitution's Preamble as a way into an examination of decades-long debate between James Baldwin and William F. […]

Tufts University “Why We are Restless: On the Modern Quest for Contentment” with Benjamin Storey, Jenna Storey, and Jonathan Silver, September 28

On September 28, 2022, the Tufts Program in Political Thought at Tufts University will be hosting fellow Benjamin Storey and Jenna Silber Storey for a virtual discussion of their recent book, Why We Are Restless: On the Modern Quest for Contentment. Wednesday, September 28, 2022 • 12:00 PM EDT Zoom • Tufts University Click here […]

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On September 30, 1868, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women was first published

On September 30, 1868, the first volume of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women was published. The novel, centering on a family of four girls whose father was away in the Civil War, was hugely popular from the start. 154 years later, it’s still a children’s classic, beloved for its themes of perseverance and family. 👩‍🦰👩‍🦰👩👧 […]

Harvard: Whig Improvement and Constitutional Conservation

On September 30, 2022, Harvard University's Program on Constitutional Government will host JMC faculty partner Greg Weiner for a lecture on Whig political thought and conserving the Constitution. Friday, September 30, 2022 • 12:00 PM EDT CGIS North (Knafel), Room K-354 • Harvard University RSVP to attend: pcg@gov.harvard.edu Andy Zwick, Executive Director     Greg […]

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On this day in 1908, Ford’s Model T went on sale for the first time

On this day in 1908, Ford’s Model T went on sale for the first time. One of the first mass-production vehicles, the Model T is generally considered the first affordable automobile made for use by the general populace. Though modern cars existed long before the Model T, they were not particularly accessible to ordinary people. […]

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On October 1, 1832, First Lady Caroline Harrison born in Oxford, Ohio

On October 1, 1832, First Lady Caroline Harrison was born in Oxford, Ohio. As First Lady, Harrison’s philanthropic efforts focused on women’s causes – she notably raised funds for Johns Hopkins medical school on the condition that it admit women. Caroline also had a love for history, music, dancing, and the arts. A music teacher, […]

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October is National Seafood Month!

October is National Seafood Month! The American seafood industry has been honored by Congress with this distinction for the past 30 years. It has operated for much longer of course, with both Native Americans and early settlers taking advantage of abundant fishing along the East Coast. 🦀🐟🦪🍤 Did you know? Though we view lobster as a […]

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On October 2, 1968, Redwood National and State Parks were established

On October 2, 1968, Redwood National and State Parks were established in California. Coast redwoods are the tallest trees on earth, reaching heights of over 350 feet! These protected areas are home to the tallest tree in the world, the Hyperion, which is nearly 380 feet tall. 🌲🌲🌲 Did you know? Despite their enormous size, […]

Samford University “Tocqueville, Law, and the Priests of Democracy” with Richard Avramenko, October 3 at 6:30

Tocqueville, Law and the High Priests of Democracy Speaker: Richard Avramenko of the University of Wisconsin Date: Monday, October 3rd at 6:30 p.m. Location: Regions Community Resource Room: BSOB 400 at Cooney Hall, Samford University Why is democracy important? Why has Americafought so hard to preserve its constitution andgovernment? On Monday, Oct. 3, Samford University's Colloquium […]

University of Nebraska-Omaha: Freedom from Religion or Freedom for Religion: Rethinking the First Amendment’s Protection for Religious Liberty

On October 6, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Forum at the University of Nebraska-Omaha will be hosting a public lecture with JMC faculty partner Vincent Phillip Muñoz on "Freedom from Religion or Freedom for Religion: Rethinking the First Amendment's Protection for Religious Liberty." Thursday, October 6, 2022 • 10:00 AM CDT CPACS 132 (Collaborating Commons Room) […]

Christendom: The Oracle of the Enlightenment – Montesquieu

On October 7, 2022, the Tocqueville Forum at Christendom College will be hosting a lecture and seminar on Montesquieu with Professor Khalil Habib (Hillsdale College): Dr. Habib will deliver a public lecture then lead a small seminar discussion with a group of select students. His overall topic is Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws--one of the […]

Lee University: Intercollegiate Symposium on Institutions and Inheritance

On October 7-8, 2022, Lee University’s Center for Responsible Citizenship will host its 7th Annual Symposium on Civic Virtue and Thought. The theme this year is “Institutions and Inheritance,” which will explore the role of tradition and institutions in framing political desires and discourse. “We sometimes forget that the right thing must be done in […]

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On this day in 1871, the Great Chicago Fire began

On this day in 1871, the Great Chicago Fire began, destroying thousands of buildings and claiming roughly 300 lives over the course of three days. A dangerously dry summer and gusting winds made conditions in the Midwest ripe for fire – the same day that the Great Chicago Fire started, devastating fires also broke out […]

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National Chess Day!

It’s National Chess Day! Celebrated each year on the second Saturday of October, the day encourages a greater appreciation for the game and gives chess enthusiasts another excuse to play. ♟♟♟ Some version of chess has been popular for over 1000 years! Several notable Americans played chess, including Benjamin Franklin, who waxed, “It is so […]

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On this day in 1901, the White House officially became the “White House”

On this day in 1901, the White House officially became “the White House”. Prior to Theodore Roosevelt’s order, the White House was officially called “the Executive Mansion.” Did you know? As a nickname, “the White House” dates back to 1798, when the new building was first whitewashed to protect its porous sandstone walls from freezing. […]

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October 12 is National Farmer’s Day!

October 12 is National Farmer’s Day! On this day, we honor all the hard work done by America’s farmers to bring food to our tables. 🍞🌽🍎🥚 According to the American Farm Bureau Federation, 98% of the 2 million farms in the country are family businesses. 🐄🏡🐖🐓 Did you know? Less than 2% of America’s workforce […]

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On this day in 1754, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley was born near Trenton, New Jersey

On this day in 1754, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauley (an inspiration for legendary Revolutionary War hero Molly Pitcher) was born near Trenton, New Jersey. Like many soldiers’ wives during the Revolution, McCauley followed her husband’s troop and performed mundane (but crucial) tasks like washing clothes and hauling water. Did you know? There is no definitive […]

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Happy Birthday to the U.S. Navy!

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Navy! On October 13, 1775, the Continental Congress voted to send two armed sailing vessels out to intercept ships carrying munitions and supplies to the British. From this tiny force of 160 patriots, the U.S. Navy eventually expanded to a mighty force of 300,000+ active duty members today. The Navy’s […]

Boston College: Constitutionalism and the Revolution – A Conversation with Gordon Wood

On October 13, 2022, the John Marshall Project at Boston College, a JMC partner program, will host faculty partner Gordon Wood for a discussion of his new book Power and Liberty: Constitutionalism in the American Revolution. Thursday, October 13, 2022 • 4:30 PM EDT Corcoran Commons, 205 • Boston College Click here to learn more >> […]

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On October 14, 1994, Saguaro National Park was established in Arizona

On October 14, 1994, Saguaro National Park was established in Arizona. The park is home to the giant saguaro – the largest cactus in the United States and arguably the most recognizable symbol of the American West. 🏜🌵🏜🌵🏜 Truly American, saguaros only grow in the Sonoran Desert in Arizona, California, and Mexico, where they can […]

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On October 16, 1758, American lexicographer Noah Webster was born in West Hartford, Connecticut

On October 16, 1758, American lexicographer Noah Webster was born in West Hartford, Connecticut. Though it was not the first American English language dictionary, Webster’s dictionary, completed in 1828, is often credited as the first significant compilation of American English as distinct from British English. 🖊📖🇺🇸 Today, Webster is still a huge name in American […]

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National No Beard Day!

It’s National No Beard Day! 🪒🪒🪒 Did you know? Nearly every U.S. president could celebrate this day – only 5 of our 46 presidents have worn beards, the first being Abraham Lincoln.🧔🧔🧔🧔🧔 11-year-old Grace Bedell famously wrote to him, urging Abe to grow a beard: “I have got 4 brothers and part of them will […]

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On October 19, 1781, the British surrendered to George Washington’s army

On October 19, 1781, the British, led by General Lord Charles Cornwallis, surrendered to George Washington’s army at Yorktown, Virginia, effectually ending the Revolutionary War. The surrender marked an end to a three-week siege carried out by allied American and French forces against the British. 🇺🇸🇬🇧 Did you know? Going against accepted military custom, Cornwallis […]

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On this day in 1797, the USS Constitution was launched in Boston Harbor

On this day in 1797, the USS Constitution (“Old Ironsides”) was launched in Boston Harbor. Still afloat in Boston today, the USS Constitution is the oldest ship commissioned in the United States Navy and the oldest commissioned warship afloat in the world. Did you know? George Washington named the Constitution. The nickname, “Old Ironsides,” was […]

Providence College: What Do the Humanities Do?

On October 21, 2022, the Frederick Douglass Project at Providence College will host Eric Adler for a discussion of the humanities and why they matter: In the late nineteenth century, […]

Villanova: W.B. Allen on The State of Black America

On October 25, 2022, the Matthew J. Ryan Center at Villanova University will host W.B. Allen for a discussion of his recent edited volume, The State of Black America: Progress, Pitfalls, and the Promise of the Republic. The event is part of the Ryan Center's 2022-23 lecture series on "The Constitution: The Meaning of Equality." […]

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On October 27, 1787, the first of the Federalist Papers (Federalist 1) was published in The Independent Journal and The New York Packet

On October 27, 1787, the first of the Federalist Papers (Federalist 1) was published in The Independent Journal and The New York Packet. 🗞📰📝 Written by Alexander Hamilton under the pseudonym Publius, it was the first of a series of seventy-seven articles written along with James Madison and John Jay to address concerns about the […]

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Tonight is known as Mischief Night!

For roughly a quarter of Americans (particularly in the Northeast and parts of the Midwest), tonight is known as Mischief Night! (Or Cabbage Night, Devil’s Night, or Goosey Night depending on the region one lives in.) The night before Halloween is seen as a time of mischief for young people, with common pranks including toilet […]

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The American origins of the Jack o’ Lantern

Jack o’ lanterns as we know them today have American origins. Pumpkins are native to the Americas (first grown in Central America) so the first jack o’ lanterns carved in Europe was made with turnips or other similar root vegetables. 🥔🍠🥔 Plentiful in America, pumpkins were a valuable source of food for early colonists in […]

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On October 31, 1994, Death Valley National Park was established in both California and Nevada

On October 31, 1994, Death Valley National Park was established in both California and Nevada. Death Valley earns its name: a place of extremes, it is the hottest place on Earth (!) and contains the driest and lowest points in North America. The world record highest air temperature (134° F!!!) was recorded at Death Valley’s […]

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On November 1, 1938, famed American racehorse Seabiscuit outran Triple Crown winner War Admiral in a “match of the century.”

On November 1, 1938, famed American racehorse Seabiscuit outran Triple Crown winner War Admiral in a “match of the century.” 🐎🐎🐎 Small, scrawny, and uncooperative in training, Seabiscuit was an unlikely champion racehorse. The little underdog served as an inspiration to Americans caught up in the Great Depression and an impending world war. The race […]

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On November 2, 1889, North Dakota entered the Union as our 39th state

On November 2, 1889, North Dakota entered the Union as our 39th state. A beautiful and largely rural state, North Dakota contains both the most wildlife refuges and the largest grassland in the United States. 🌾🌾🌅🌾🌾 Did you know? North Dakota is home to the Enchanted Highway, a 32-mile passage of highway dotted by some […]

University of Nevada-Las Vegas: Thinking about Reparations

On November 2, 2022, the University of Nevada-Las Vegas's Great Works Academic Certificate Program will host JMC faculty partner Andrew Delbanco for a virtual lecture on reparations. Wednesday, November 2, […]

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Today is Election Day!

Today is Election Day ! 🗳🗳🗳 Did you know? Election Day always falls on the first Tuesday after the first Monday of November. Why this day? For one, farming schedules […]

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On this day in 1775, the U.S. Marine Corps was created

On this day in 1775, the U.S. Marine Corps was created as the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution to form two battalions of Continental Marines to augment naval operations. The Marines made their first amphibious raid a few months later, successfully seizing British gunpowder and munitions at Fort Nassau in the Bahamas. Did you […]

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On November 10, 1978, Badlands National Park was established in South Dakota

On November 10, 1978, Badlands National Park was established in South Dakota. The Badlands (so-called for its uninhabitability) is a swath of striking geological formations including pinnacles, buttes, and gorges mixed with prairie land. Did you know? The park is a prime location for fossils and has more Eocene and Oligocene mammal fossils than any […]

Boston College: Democracy and Enlightenment – The Challenge of Rousseau

On November 10-11, 2022, the John Marshall Project at Boston College, a JMC partner program, will host a two-day conference featuring leading scholars of the Enlightenment period who will present assessments of Rousseau and the Enlightenment, focusing especially on their contributions to our understanding of democracy. Additionally, the conference will serve as an occasion to […]

University of Nebraska-Omaha: Liberty, Union, and the Constitution – Lessons from the Nineteenth Century

On November 10, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Forum at the University of Nebraska-Omaha will be hosting a panel discussion featuring three distinguished scholars presenting on the constitutional thought of three important nineteenth century American leaders. Lucas Morel of Washington and Lee University will present on Abraham Lincoln. Peter Myers of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire […]

University of Alaska-Anchorage: Harry C. Veryser on Economics

On November 10, 2022, Harry C. Veryser will speak for the University of Alaska's Chartwell Lecture Series: Our lecturer will be Harry C. Veryser, who has served as Director of Graduate Studies in Economics at the University of Detroit Mercy and as chairman of the Department of Economics and Finance at Walsh College. He is […]

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On this day in 1620, 41 colonists signed the Mayflower Compact

On this day in 1620, 41 colonists signed the Mayflower Compact off the coast of present-day Cape Cod, Massachusetts. A religiously divided group of Separatist Pilgrims and pro-Church of England colonists, the settlers needed some type of binding governance to survive together in a new land. The Mayflower Compact filled this need, organizing the colonists […]

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Happy Veterans Day!

Each year, Veterans Day honors the bravery and sacrifice of American veterans, both past and present. 🇺🇸 🇺🇸 🇺🇸 Did you know? For many years, Veterans Day was Armistice Day. Although World War I officially ended with the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, fighting ceased much earlier with an armistice on November 11, 1918. President […]

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Today is Veterans Day!

Occurring every year on November 11, Veterans Day honors the bravery and sacrifice of American veterans, past and present. 🇺🇸🪖🇺🇸🪖🇺🇸🪖 Did you know? For many years, the occasion was celebrated […]

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On November 14, 1896, First Lady Mamie Eisenhower was born in Boone, Iowa

On November 14, 1896, First Lady Mamie Eisenhower was born in Boone, Iowa. Despite the demands of being a military wife, and then, the wife of a prominent figure, she always had a cheerful, outgoing demeanor that endeared her to the public. She publicly shunned political involvement, but her actions often spoke louder than words. […]

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On this day in 1801, the first issue of the New York Post was published

On this day in 1801, the first issue of the New York Post was published. The newspaper was founded by Alexander Hamilton, and, like its founder, supported Federalist policies on a central bank and foreign policy. Did you know? Hamilton wrote attack pieces on Thomas Jefferson in the Post using the pseudonym, "Lucius Crassus," after […]

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On November 16, 1907, Oklahoma entered the Union as our 46th state

On November 16, 1907, Oklahoma entered the Union as our 46th state. Located in Tornado Alley, it is one of the most tornado prone regions of the country. 🌪🌪🌪 Did you know? Oklahoma is distinguished by a large Native American population. There are over 40 distinct Native languages spoken there and roughly half of the […]

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On November 22, 1744, First Lady Abigail Adams was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts

On November 22, 1744, First Lady Abigail Adams was born in Weymouth, Massachusetts. She may be best remembered for her remark to her husband, founding father John Adams, to “remember the ladies” while making laws for the emerging United States. 🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️🙋‍♀️ Abigail was keenly interested in the development of the new country, and the 1000+ […]

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Happy Thanksgiving from JMC!

Happy Thanksgiving from JMC! Thanksgiving, one of our country's oldest holidays, has roots in both the Native American and European traditions. The Wampanoags and other Native American tribes traditionally held […]

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving from JMC! Thanksgiving, one of our country's oldest holidays, has roots in both Native American and European traditions. The Wampanoags and other Native American tribes traditionally held ceremonies […]

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Today is Black Friday, one of the busiest shopping days of the year!

Today is Black Friday, one of the busiest shopping days of the year! 🛍🛍🛍 Did you know? It’s believed that the term “Black Friday” was first used in reference to the day after Thanksgiving by Philadelphia police officers in the 1950s to describe the mayhem of tourists visiting the city each year to shop and […]

University of Missouri: An Evening with Former Columbia Mayor Brian Treece

On November 29, 2022, the Missouri Debate Union at the University of Missouri, a JMC partner program, will host an interview and Q&A with Former Columbia, Missouri Mayor Brian Treece: Join the Missouri Debate Union for an interview and Q&A with Former Columbia Mayor, Brian Treece. Learn about Mayor Treece's background, history, and experience as […]

Benedictine College: Lincoln and the Kansas-Nebraska Act

On November 29, 2022, the Center for Constitutional Liberty at Benedictine College will host faculty partner Michael Zuckert for a discussion of Abraham Lincoln and the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Tuesday, November 29, 2022 • 4:00 PM CST Gangel Seminar Room, Third Floor, Ferrell Academic Center. • Benedictine College Click here to learn more >>     […]

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On this day in 1835, American author Mark Twain was born in Florida, Missouri

On this day in 1835, American author Mark Twain (né Samuel Clemens) was born in Florida, Missouri. Popular for his colorful and humorous style, Twain nonetheless tackled serious issues in American society, such as slavery and race, morality, and human nature. His most famous book may be The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which portrays slavery […]

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Happy National Cookie Day!

It’s National Cookie Day! 🍪 🍪 🍪 Did you know? Cookies in colonial America were made from simple ingredients like sugar and butter. These butter cookies were close relatives of teacakes and shortbread of the Old World. With progress in shipping and transportation, however, cookie varieties eventually exploded – in modern times we enjoy cookies […]

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Happy Bill of Rights Day!

Happy Bill of Rights Day! 📜 🖋 📜 🖋 📜 On this day in 1791, the Bill of Rights was ratified, consisting of the first ten amendments to our Constitution. Inspired by such documents as the Magna Carta and Virginia Declaration of Rights, the Bill of Rights explicitly protected such basic American rights as freedom […]

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On this day in 1773, the Boston Tea Party took place

On this day in 1773, the Boston Tea Party occurred as American colonists protested the Tea Act and British “taxation without representation” by dumping over 45 tons of tea into Boston Harbor. That’s right – tons. The tea was worth over $1,000,000 in today’s currency. ☕️ 💵 ☕️ 💵 ☕️ 💵 The event served as […]

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On this day in 1777, the first national Thanksgiving was celebrated

On this day in 1777, the first national Thanksgiving was celebrated to give thanks for the American victory at the Battle of Saratoga. The victory proved to be a crucial turning point, helping to persuade the French to recognize and assist the patriotic cause. Proclaimed by then-General George Washington, the day of Thanksgiving called Americans […]

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On this day in 1732, Benjamin Franklin first published Poor Richard’s Almanack under the pseudonym of Richard Saunders

On this day in 1732, Benjamin Franklin first published Poor Richard’s Almanack under the pseudonym of Richard Saunders. The best-selling almanac contained a calendar and weather predictions (as expected), but also entertained readers with humor pieces, proverbs, poems, and more. Some of Poor Richard’s proverbs included: “No gains without pains.” 💪 😫 “Early to bed […]

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Today marks the first day of winter

Today marks the first day of winter and is the shortest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. Did you know? In the United States, several Native American tribes observed (and still observe) the beginning of winter with traditions including dance, prayer, and, in particular, storytelling. Winter Landscape in the Sun, Carl Kenzler, c. […]

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It’s Christmas Day

Did you know? Although the holiday is believed to date back to 336 A.D., Christmas did not catch on across the United States until the latter half of the 1700s. During colonial times, celebrations (or lack thereof) greatly depended on the predominant sect of each region. In Puritan New England, Christmas celebrations were often banned […]

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28th president Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia

On this day in 1856, 28th president Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia. During Wilson’s administration, he was responsible for the United States abstention from (and subsequent entry into) World War I, as well as the implementation of several progressive policies. Wilson was also responsible for founding the League of Nations. Though the United […]

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17th president Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina

On this day in 1808, 17th president Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina. The successor to Lincoln, Johnson had huge shoes to fill, wrestling with Reconstruction in a nation still heavily divided. Johnson was at odds with his “Radical Republican” Congress, who condemned his policies as too lenient to the South. This tension […]

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The first New Year’s Eve “ball drop” in Times Square

On this day in 1907, the first New Year’s Eve “ball drop” in Times Square took place in New York City. The first ball was tiny but heavy – only 5 feet in diameter, but 700 pounds, it was carefully lowered down a flagpole by pulley. Unlike the modern ball, which is famously covered in […]

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Happy New Year!

In colonial America, it was customary to exchange small gifts on New Year’s Day and visit with friends and neighbors. One common (and fragrant!) gift was an orange with cloves stuck into it, often forming designs. 🍊🍊🍊 In the American South, people traditionally ate black-eyed peas for New Year. The peas were thought to resemble […]

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Happy National Bird Day!

One of the most famous (and rare) books of American birds is John J. Audubon’s Birds of America. Printed as a subscription from 1827 to 1838, the book contains over 400 watercolor illustrations of North American birds that are still studied and admired today. Did you know? Audubon was likely the first person in North […]

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13th president Millard Fillmore was born in Cayuga County, New York

On this day in 1800, 13th president Millard Fillmore was born in Cayuga County, New York. His presidency was defined by the passage of the Compromise of 1850, which temporarily staved off disputes between pro-and anti-slavery factions. Though the Compromise abolished slavery in Washington D.C. and created a free state in California, it also included […]

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On this day in 1790, George Washington delivered the first State of the Union Address to Congress at Federal Hall in New York City

On this day in 1790, George Washington delivered the first State of the Union Address to Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. Among other things, Washington presented the young nation’s current affairs in foreign policy, the economy, immigration, and national defense. Informed by a requirement in Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution, […]

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Virginia enacted the Statute for Religious Freedom

On this day in 1786, Virginia enacted the Statute for Religious Freedom. The statute disestablished the Church of England as Virginia’s official state-supported religion and implemented freedom of worship. 🙏 ✝️ 🙏 ☪️ 🙏 ✡️ 🙏 Authored by Thomas Jefferson, the statute was an important precursor to the protection of religious liberty and separation of […]

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Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day!

Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day! Did you know? It took over 15 years for Martin Luther King Jr. Day to come into being. In the year after King’s death, Congressman John Conyers Jr. introduced legislation to create the federal holiday. Three years later, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference also presented Congress with a petition […]

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On this day in 1809, Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts

On this day in 1809, American suspense and horror writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Poe’s short stories and poems, including such classics as “The Raven”, “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Cask of Amontillado”, are still widely read and admired for their macabre themes and mysterious story-telling. Did you know? Poe was […]

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National Hot Sauce Day!

It’s National Hot Sauce Day! 🌶🌶🌶 Did you know that hot sauce has deep American roots? Chilis were domesticated in present-day Mexico around 5000 B.C. The Aztecs and Mayans combined […]

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John Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts

On this day in 1737, founding father, successful merchant, and first signer of the Declaration of Independence John Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts. Before the Revolution, Hancock was one of the wealthiest men in New England and used his money and influence to forward the movement for American independence. He’s perhaps best known for […]

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Happy National Peanut Butter Day!

Happy National Peanut Butter Day! 🥜 🥜 🥜 This uniquely American treat was first patented in the late 1800s, as Canadian Marcellus Gilmore Edson and American John Harvey Kellogg experimented with creating pastes out of roasted and raw peanuts. Kellogg’s easily digested paste was used as a healthy food for sanitarium patients. As a result […]

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On this day in 1892, Bessie Coleman was born in Atlanta, Texas

On this day in 1892, Bessie Coleman, the first African-American and Native American woman pilot was born in Atlanta, Texas. Coleman gave speeches, and lessons, and toured across America and Europe, encouraging other women to pursue flight and dazzling crowds with her daring air tricks. 🛩 🛩 🛩 She also publicly stood up against segregation, […]

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Happy Groundhog Day!

Today, the groundhog saw his shadow – six more weeks of winter! 🌨🌨🌨 Groundhog Day was first officially celebrated on this day in 1887 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Members of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club still gather in Gobbler’s Knob to lift Phil high in the air and oversee the proceedings in Pennsylvania Dutch. So, where did […]

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On this day in 1870, the 15th Amendment was ratified

On this day in 1870, the 15th Amendment was ratified, giving all American men the right to vote, regardless of race or previous state of servitude. Significantly, this meant that emancipated slaves and other African Americans had all the rights and privileges awarded by the Constitution to every U.S. citizen. The immediate effects of the […]

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On this day in 1756, Aaron Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey

On this day in 1756, infamous American politician Aaron Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey. Though he may be best-known for his duel with Alexander Hamilton (which proved fatal to Hamilton), Burr was also a Revolutionary War hero and served as vice president in the Jefferson administration, during which time he set a high […]

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9th president William Henry Harrison born in Berkeley, Virginia

On this day in 1773, 9th president William Henry Harrison was born in Berkeley, Virginia. He served the shortest term of any president – a mere month – before expiring from pneumonia. Though he didn’t make much impact as president, Harrison was well-known as a general in the War of 1812 and in battles with […]

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16th president Abraham Lincoln born near Hodgenville, Kentucky

On this day in 1809, 16th president Abraham Lincoln was born near Hodgenville, Kentucky. We particularly honor Lincoln for his leadership in steering the country through a civil war intact and for taking the necessary steps to end slavery once and for all. Did you know? Outside of his political prowess, Lincoln was an inventor. […]

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Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day! ❤️❤️❤️ Though this holiday has origins in the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia and as a Christian feast day, it wasn’t until the 17th and 18th centuries that it became popular to mark the day by exchanging notes and tokens of affection with friends and lovers. 💋💝🥂💐 Did you know? Handmade cards […]

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Susan B. Anthony born in Adams, Massachusetts

On this day in 1820, American activist Susan B. Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts. An icon of the women’s suffrage movement, Anthony founded the National American Woman Suffrage Association […]