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First night of Hanukkah for Jewish communities around the world

This evening marks the first night of Hanukkah for Jewish communities around the world. Did you know? In comparison to major Jewish holidays like Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Hanukkah is actually a fairly minor religious festival. In the 19th century, however, both Hanukkah and Christmas saw a rise in popularity in the United States. […]

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It’s Christmas Day

Did you know? Although the holiday is believed to date back to 336 A.D., Christmas did not catch on across the United States until the latter half of the 1700s. During colonial times, celebrations (or lack thereof) greatly depended on the predominant sect of each region. In Puritan New England, Christmas celebrations were often banned […]

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28th president Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia

On this day in 1856, 28th president Woodrow Wilson was born in Staunton, Virginia. During Wilson’s administration, he was responsible for the United States abstention from (and subsequent entry into) World War I, as well as the implementation of several progressive policies. Wilson was also responsible for founding the League of Nations. Though the United […]

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17th president Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina

On this day in 1808, 17th president Andrew Johnson was born in Raleigh, North Carolina. The successor to Lincoln, Johnson had huge shoes to fill, wrestling with Reconstruction in a nation still heavily divided. Johnson was at odds with his “Radical Republican” Congress, who condemned his policies as too lenient to the South. This tension […]

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The first New Year’s Eve “ball drop” in Times Square

On this day in 1907, the first New Year’s Eve “ball drop” in Times Square took place in New York City. The first ball was tiny but heavy – only 5 feet in diameter, but 700 pounds, it was carefully lowered down a flagpole by pulley. Unlike the modern ball, which is famously covered in […]

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Happy New Year!

In colonial America, it was customary to exchange small gifts on New Year’s Day and visit with friends and neighbors. One common (and fragrant!) gift was an orange with cloves stuck into it, often forming designs. 🍊🍊🍊 In the American South, people traditionally ate black-eyed peas for New Year. The peas were thought to resemble […]

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Happy National Bird Day!

One of the most famous (and rare) books of American birds is John J. Audubon’s Birds of America. Printed as a subscription from 1827 to 1838, the book contains over 400 watercolor illustrations of North American birds that are still studied and admired today. Did you know? Audubon was likely the first person in North […]

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13th president Millard Fillmore was born in Cayuga County, New York

On this day in 1800, 13th president Millard Fillmore was born in Cayuga County, New York. His presidency was defined by the passage of the Compromise of 1850, which temporarily staved off disputes between pro-and anti-slavery factions. Though the Compromise abolished slavery in Washington D.C. and created a free state in California, it also included […]

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On this day in 1790, George Washington delivered the first State of the Union Address to Congress at Federal Hall in New York City

On this day in 1790, George Washington delivered the first State of the Union Address to Congress at Federal Hall in New York City. Among other things, Washington presented the young nation’s current affairs in foreign policy, the economy, immigration, and national defense. Informed by a requirement in Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution, […]

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On this day in 1929, Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia

On this day in 1929, minister and activist leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. A figurehead of the American civil rights movement, he was a proponent of civil disobedience and non-violent protest. Persevering despite death threats, abuse, and arrest, he rose to the national stage, directing the 1963 March on Washington […]

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Virginia enacted the Statute for Religious Freedom

On this day in 1786, Virginia enacted the Statute for Religious Freedom. The statute disestablished the Church of England as Virginia’s official state-supported religion and implemented freedom of worship. 🙏 ✝️ 🙏 ☪️ 🙏 ✡️ 🙏 Authored by Thomas Jefferson, the statute was an important precursor to the protection of religious liberty and separation of […]

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Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day!

Happy Martin Luther King Jr. Day! Did you know? It took over 15 years for Martin Luther King Jr. Day to come into being. In the year after King’s death, Congressman John Conyers Jr. introduced legislation to create the federal holiday. Three years later, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference also presented Congress with a petition […]

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On this day in 1809, Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts

On this day in 1809, American suspense and horror writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Poe’s short stories and poems, including such classics as “The Raven”, “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Cask of Amontillado”, are still widely read and admired for their macabre themes and mysterious story-telling. Did you know? Poe was […]

Florida Teacher Seminar: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Legacy of the Civil Rights Movement

Florida teachers gathered virtually with JMC faculty partners Peter Myers (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire) and Lee Trepanier (Samford University) for an in-depth seminar on Martin Luther King Jr.'s political thought and the development of Civil Rights protections in the United States through Constitutional amendments, Supreme Court rulings, and federal legislation. Afterwards, JMC's Teacher Education Fellow, Dr. Danton Kostandarithes, led a classroom application […]

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National Hot Sauce Day!

It’s National Hot Sauce Day! 🌶🌶🌶 Did you know that hot sauce has deep American roots? Chilis were domesticated in present-day Mexico around 5000 B.C. The Aztecs and Mayans combined chili peppers with water to make an early hot sauce. With increased trade and colonialism in the 1500s, chilis soon spread across the world. Though […]

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John Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts

On this day in 1737, founding father, successful merchant, and first signer of the Declaration of Independence John Hancock was born in Braintree, Massachusetts. Before the Revolution, Hancock was one of the wealthiest men in New England and used his money and influence to forward the movement for American independence. He’s perhaps best known for […]

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Happy National Peanut Butter Day!

Happy National Peanut Butter Day! 🥜 🥜 🥜 This uniquely American treat was first patented in the late 1800s, as Canadian Marcellus Gilmore Edson and American John Harvey Kellogg experimented with creating pastes out of roasted and raw peanuts. Kellogg’s easily digested paste was used as a healthy food for sanitarium patients. As a result […]

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On this day in 1892, Bessie Coleman was born in Atlanta, Texas

On this day in 1892, Bessie Coleman, the first African-American and Native American woman pilot was born in Atlanta, Texas. Coleman gave speeches, and lessons, and toured across America and Europe, encouraging other women to pursue flight and dazzling crowds with her daring air tricks. 🛩 🛩 🛩 She also publicly stood up against segregation, […]

How Lincoln Moved the Nation: A Virtual Jeffersonian Seminar

The seminar will provide Bradley and JMC Fellows the opportunity to meet like-minded scholars while discussing an important topic in American political thought. We will be joined by Dr. Diana Schaub, Professor of Political Science at Loyola University Maryland, Visiting Professor in the Government Department at Harvard University, and a Visiting Scholar at the American […]

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On this day in 1843, 25th president William McKinley was born in Niles, Ohio

On this day in 1843, 25th president William McKinley was born in Niles, Ohio. His presidency was notable for an increase in protective tariffs and imperialist policies that led to the annexation of the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico. Tragically, McKinley was the third president assassinated – an anarchist shot him at the Pan-American Exposition […]

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Happy Groundhog Day!

Today, the groundhog saw his shadow – six more weeks of winter! 🌨🌨🌨 Groundhog Day was first officially celebrated on this day in 1887 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. Members of the Punxsutawney Groundhog Club still gather in Gobbler’s Knob to lift Phil high in the air and oversee the proceedings in Pennsylvania Dutch. So, where did […]

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On this day in 1870, the 15th Amendment was ratified

On this day in 1870, the 15th Amendment was ratified, giving all American men the right to vote, regardless of race or previous state of servitude. Significantly, this meant that emancipated slaves and other African Americans had all the rights and privileges awarded by the Constitution to every U.S. citizen. The immediate effects of the […]

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On this day in 1756, Aaron Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey

On this day in 1756, infamous American politician Aaron Burr was born in Newark, New Jersey. Though he may be best-known for his duel with Alexander Hamilton (which proved fatal to Hamilton), Burr was also a Revolutionary War hero and served as vice president in the Jefferson administration, during which time he set a high […]

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9th president William Henry Harrison born in Berkeley, Virginia

On this day in 1773, 9th president William Henry Harrison was born in Berkeley, Virginia. He served the shortest term of any president – a mere month – before expiring from pneumonia. Though he didn’t make much impact as president, Harrison was well-known as a general in the War of 1812 and in battles with […]

SUNY-Geneseo: Freedom of Speech and Its Skeptics

On February 10, 2022, the Forum on Constitutionalism and Democracy at SUNY-Geneseo held a virtual discussion with faculty partner Lorraine Pangle on freedom of speech: This lecture surveys both the case for free speech, grounded in the classical liberal principles that guided the founding of the United States and its universities, and the strongest contemporary […]

George Fox University: Civic Education and the Constitution

The John Dickinson Forum at George Fox University, a JMC partner program, hosted board member Wilfred McClay to speak on American civic education and the Constitution. Thursday, February 10, 2022 • 6:30 PM PST Hoover 105 • George Fox University Free and open to the public. Questions? Contact Mark David Hall at mhall@georgefox.edu.     […]

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16th president Abraham Lincoln born near Hodgenville, Kentucky

On this day in 1809, 16th president Abraham Lincoln was born near Hodgenville, Kentucky. We particularly honor Lincoln for his leadership in steering the country through a civil war intact and for taking the necessary steps to end slavery once and for all. Did you know? Outside of his political prowess, Lincoln was an inventor. […]

Bellarmine University: 2022 Constitution Symposium

On February 12, 2022, Christopher R. Green, the Jamie L. Whitten Chair in Law and Government at the University of Mississippi School of Law, spoke on “Equal Citizenship, Civil Rights, and the Constitution: The Original Sense of the Privileges or Immunities Clause” drawing upon his book of the same title: The Privileges or Immunities Clause […]

Super Bowl Sunday 2022

It’s Super Bowl Sunday! Whether sports fans or not, every American recognizes this nationally-celebrated football game. The first Super Bowl took place in 1967 between the Green Bay Packers and the Kansas City Chiefs, but wasn’t given the name “Super Bowl” until Super Bowl III in 1969. 🏈 🏈 🏈 For viewers less interested in […]

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Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day! ❤️❤️❤️ Though this holiday has origins in the Roman fertility festival of Lupercalia and as a Christian feast day, it wasn’t until the 17th and 18th centuries that it became popular to mark the day by exchanging notes and tokens of affection with friends and lovers. 💋💝🥂💐 Did you know? Handmade cards […]

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Susan B. Anthony born in Adams, Massachusetts

On this day in 1820, American activist Susan B. Anthony was born in Adams, Massachusetts. An icon of the women’s suffrage movement, Anthony founded the National American Woman Suffrage Association with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and helped pave the way for the Nineteenth Amendment. Aside from her activism for women’s rights, Anthony was also a vocal […]

University of Portland: Religious Liberty and the First Amendment

On February 15, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Minor at the University of Portland hosted JMC faculty partner Vincent Phillip Muñoz for a lecture on religious freedom and the First Amendment. Tuesday, February 15, 2022 University of Portland     Vincent Phillip Muñoz is the Tocqueville Associate Professor of Political Science and Concurrent Associate Professor of Law […]

Princeton: Our Dear-Bought Liberty

On February 17, 2022, the James Madison Program at Princeton University hosted JMC fellow Michael Breidenbach for a discussion of his recent book, Our Dear-Bought Liberty, which examines the history of how early American Catholics justified secularism and overcame suspicions of disloyalty, transforming ideas of religious liberty in the process. In colonial America, Catholics were […]

Samford: The Modern Self and Civic Politics

On February 17, 2022, the American Constitution, Citizenship, and Community Speaker Series at Samford University hosted Carl Trueman for a public lecture on "The Modern Self and Civic Politics." Thursday, February 17, 2022 • 6:00 PM CST Regions Room, Brock School of Business • Samford University Click here for more information >>     Carl […]

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn first published in the U.S.

On this day in 1885, Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was first published in the United States. The book, still widely-read for its portrayal of race relations, focuses on the relationship between a young boy, Huckleberry Finn, and an escaped slave, Jim. Though a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, it far surpassed […]

Baylor: What Happened to the Vital Center?

On February 18, 2022, the Zavala Program for Constitutional Studies at Baylor University hosted Sidney Milkis (University of Virginia) for a lecture on his recent book (co-written with Nicholas Jacobs), What Happened to the Vital Center? Friday, February 18, 2022 Baylor University Click here to learn more >>     Sidney M. Milkis is the […]

Lee University: Intercollegiate Symposium on Wendell Berry

On February 18-19, 2022, Lee University’s Center for Responsible Citizenship hosted its 6th Annual Symposium on Civic Virtue and Thought. The theme of this year’s symposium is “Persons and Place: Wendell Berry and the Weight of Love,” which will explore the importance of human connection and locality through Wendell Berry’s writings. This intercollegiate symposium brings […]

Happy Presidents Day!

Happy Presidents Day! 🏛🏛🏛 Presidents Day, as we now call it, began as an officially recognized celebration of George Washington’s birthday in 1885. During the 1960s, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which pushed several federal holiday observances to Mondays in order to allow for three-day weekends. This effectively moved Washington’s Birthday from its […]

University of Oklahoma: The (Un)Written Constitution

On February 21, 2022, the University of Oklahoma's Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage hosted JMC faculty partner George Thomas to give a talk for Presidents Day on his new book, The (Un)Written Constitution. Monday, February 21, 2022 University of Oklahoma Click here to learn more >>     George Thomas is the Burnet C. […]

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George Washington born in Westmoreland County, Virginia

On this day in 1732, founding father and our 1st president George Washington was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Aside from serving two terms as our first president, Washington was Commander in Chief of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Uniquely, he was in a position of steering the emerging nation to success not […]

University of Nebraska-Omaha: The U.S. Constitution as a Politics of Imperfection

On February 22, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Forum at the University of Nebraska-Omaha hosted David McPherson for a lecture on the Constitution and imperfection. Tuesday, February 22, 2022 • 10:00 AM CST CPACS, 132 • University of Nebraska-Omaha Free and open to the public. Click here to watch on Youtube>> David McPherson is an Associate […]

UC-Berkeley: Getting Right with the Original 14th Amendment

On February 22, 2022, the Public Law and Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley hosted Randy E. Barnett and Linda Lee Denno for a hybrid in-person/virtual discussion of the Fourteenth Amendment. Tuesday, February 22, 2022 • 12:50 PM PST Berkeley Law, Room 105 • University of California-Berkeley A hybrid in-person/virtual event free and […]

University of Nebraska-Omaha: Patriotism versus Cosmopolitanism

On February 22, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Forum at the University of Nebraska-Omaha hosted David McPherson for a lecture on "Somewheres and Anywheres: Patriotism versus Cosmopolitanism." Tuesday, February 22, 2022 • 3:00 PM CST University of Nebraska-Omaha Click here to learn more >>     David McPherson is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Creighton […]

Clemson: Václav Havel and the Problem of Dissent

On February 22, 2022, the Lyceum Program at Clemson University hosted JMC fellow Flagg Taylor for a virtual lecture on Václav Havel and his insights into communism: In 1975 the Czech playwright-dissident turned statesman, Václav Havel, got “tired of being tired” and wrote a public letter to the General Secretary of the Communist Party of […]

University of Nevada-Las Vegas: Frederick Douglass, the Making of an American

On February 23, 2022, the University of Nevada-Las Vegas's Great Works Academic Certificate Program hosted JMC faculty partner Lucas Morel for an in-person/virtual lecture on Frederick Douglass's life and character: Professor Morel will explore how a man who had every reason to hate America became one of the nation’s strongest defenders. Born into slavery, Douglass […]

University of North Texas: Jefferson and the Native Americans

On February 24, 2022, the University of North Texas's Constitutionalism and Democracy Forum hosted JMC faculty partner Jeremy Bailey to present his research on Thomas Jefferson and Native Americans. Thursday, February 24, 2022 University of North Texas Free and open to the public.     Jeremy D. Bailey is Professor and Sanders Chair in Law […]

Texas State University: The Crisis of the Two Constitutions

On February 24, 2022, Texas State University hosted faculty partner Charles Kesler for a discussion of constitutional interpretation and partisanship: American politics are embittered by the growing fracture between two rival constitutions, two opposed cultures, two contrary ways of life. American conservatives rally around the founders’ Constitution, as amended and as grounded in the rights […]

Baylor: Corporations and the Constitution of Civil Liberty

On February 25, 2022, the Zavala Program for Constitutional Studies at Baylor University hosted JMC fellow Matthew Brogdon for a discussion of corporations and civil liberty. Friday, February 25, 2022 • 2:30 PM CST Bennett Auditorium • Baylor University Free and open to the public Click here to learn more >>     Matthew Brogdon […]

Arizona State University: Racism, Race and the Dignity of our Individuality

On February 25, 2022, the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University, a JMC partner program, hosted Kmele Foster and Karen Attiah for the third and final discussion in its series, "Can We Talk Honestly About Race?": In the third and final event in the series, co-founder and executive producer […]

“Buffalo Bill” Cody born near LeClaire, Iowa

On this day in 1846, William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody was born near LeClaire, Iowa. Cody came to symbolize “Wild West” culture in America with his famous Wild West Show, featuring figures like Annie Oakley and Sitting Bull. He was not just well-known in the U.S., but arguably one of the most famous Americans in […]

The Supreme Court and Judicial Review

Zoom

A Virtual Seminar for Florida Teachers   Professor David Ramsey (University of West Florida) will lead an interactive discussion for Florida teachers on the Supreme Court and the development of the principle of judicial review. Readings for the seminar will include Constitutional articles, Federalist and Antifederalist papers, and Marbury v. Madison (1800). After the discussion, Dr. […]

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Henry Wadsworth Longfellow born in Portland, Maine

On this day in 1807, American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine. He is one of the best-known poets of the nineteenth century, authoring such prominent and lasting works as “Paul Revere’s Ride”, “The Courtship of Miles Standish”, The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. His works appealed to the masses. Did you […]

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Yellowstone National Park established in 1872

On this day in 1872, Yellowstone National Park was established as President Ulysses S. Grant signed an act protecting over 2 million acres of wilderness as “a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people.” It was the first national park in America. 🏕🌲🦌🌳 Did you know? Yellowstone contains roughly 75% […]

UC-Berkeley: Applying the Law of War to 21st Century Warfare

On March 1, 2022, the Public Law and Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley hosted Col. Winston Williams for a discussion of the law and warfare in the 21st century. Tuesday, March 1, 2022 • 12:50 PM PST LAW Room 105 • University of California-Berkeley Click here to view on Youtube>> Col. Winston […]

University of Montana: “How Reaganism Became Trumpism”

On March 2, 2022, as a part of its President’s Lecture Series, the University of Montana hosted Ross Douthat for a discussion of changes in the Republican Party from Reaganism to Trumpism. Wednesday, March 2, 2022 • 8:00 PM MST Dennison Theatre • University of Montana Click here to learn more >> Click here to […]

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“The Star-Spangled Banner” becomes the U.S. national anthem

On this day in 1931, the United States officially adopted “The Star-Spangled Banner” as its national anthem. The song was penned in 1814, but gained greater meaning throughout the 19th century, becoming particularly impactful during and after the Civil War. Why? During the upheaval of the war, the American flag had become an even more […]

University of Houston: Lincoln on the Verge

On March 3, 2022, the University of Houston's Tocqueville Forum on American Ideas and Institutions hosted Edward Widmer to give a talk on his new book, Lincoln on the Verge: Thirteen Days to Washington: Dr. Widmer’s great book on Lincoln’s odyssey from Springfield to Washington D.C. for the Inauguration was released last year and has […]

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Boston Massacre occurs on King Street in Boston

On this day in 1770, the Boston Massacre occurred on King Street in Boston, Massachusetts as colonists rioted and British troops panicked, opening fire and killing 5 men. The incident fueled increasing anti-British sentiment as the colonies approached the Revolution. Did you know? Though labeled a “massacre”, the British troops had been provoked by the […]

Yeshiva University: Aristotle, Maimonides, and the Politics of Ethics Today

The Straus Center at Yeshiva University, a JMC partner program, hosted James Diamond to speak on Aristotle, Maimonides, and how these two thinkers—one ancient, and one medieval—can enrich our political-ethical discourse. Wednesday, March 9, 2022 Yeshiva University Learn more about the Straus Center >>     James Diamond holds the Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Chair of […]

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Harriet Tubman Day

On this day in 1913, American abolitionist and leading conductor in the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman died in Auburn, New York. An escaped slave herself, Tubman took great personal risks to lead at least 70 slaves out of the South to freedom – she never lost a passenger. Did you know? Aside from her work […]

UC-Berkeley: The Crisis of the Two Constitutions

  On March 10, 2022, the Public Law and Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley hosted JMC faculty partner Charles Kesler for a discussion of the Constitution and conflicting interpretations of it: American politics grows embittered because it is increasingly torn between two rival constitutions, two opposed cultures, two contrary ways of life. […]

Clemson: On a Certain Human Passion: Regulating Hatred on Campus and Beyond

On March 10, 2022, the Lyceum Program at Clemson University hosted Robert C. Bartlett for a lecture on human passions and hate speech: Philosophers ancient and modern have agreed that we must understand the human passions if we are going to understand ourselves. Lately, one among these passions has received a lot of attention, on […]

Princeton: Foundational Political Concepts in American History

On March 15-17, 2022, the James Madison Program at Princeton University hosted JMC board member James Ceaser for three-day lecture series on America's founding principles: First Lecture, March 15: The Categories and Sources of Foundational Concepts Second Lecture, March 16: Nature, History, and Providence in Pivotal Moments Third Lecture, March 17: Do We Still Have […]

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 🍀🍺🍀🍺🍀🍺 Irish-Americans (and not so Irish Americans) across the country celebrate Irish heritage today with parades, corned beef and cabbage, and festive green attire. The holiday, traditionally a celebration of Ireland’s patron saint, has been marked in North America for hundreds of years. The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place […]

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On this day in 1837, Grover Cleveland born in Caldwell, New Jersey

On this day in 1837, 22nd (and 24th) president Grover Cleveland was born in Caldwell, New Jersey. Cleveland is the only president to have served for two separate terms. His time in office was characterized by political reform, hot debates over tariffs and the gold standard, and the greatest economic depression yet seen in the […]

Notre Dame: How to Protect Free Speech from Big Tech

On March 24, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Program at the University of Notre Dame hosted Philip Hamburger for a hybrid in-person/virtual discussion of free speech in the age of big […]

Christendom: James Madison’s Anti-Slavery Constitutionalism

On March 24, 2022, the Tocqueville Forum on Liberal Democracy at Christendom College hosted JMC faculty partner Lynn Uzzell for a lecture on James Madison. Thursday, March 24, 2022 • 4:00 PM EDT Christendom College Click here to learn more >> Click here to watch on Youtube>>   Lynn Uzzell teaches American politics and rhetoric […]

Coastal Carolina: Globalization and Liberalism – Montesquieu, Tocqueville, and Manent

On March 24, 2022, the Cincinnatus Center at Coastal Carolina University hosted JMC fellow Trevor Shelley for a lecture on "Globalization and Liberalism: Montesquieu, Tocqueville, and Manent." Thursday, March 24, 2022 • 5:00 PM EDT Coastal Carolina University Free and open to the public.     Trevor Shelley is an Instructional Professional at Arizona State […]

American University: Catching Up with Ralph Ellison – The Blackness of Blackness

On March 24, 2022, the Political Theory Institute at American University hosted JMC faculty partner Lucas Morel for a discussion of Ralph Ellison. Thursday, March 24, 2022 • 5:30 PM EDT A virtual event • American University Click here to learn more and register >> Click here to watch on Youtube>>   Lucas Morel is […]

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First Lady Lou Hoover born in Waterloo, Iowa

On March 29, 1874, First Lady Lou Hoover was born in Waterloo, Iowa. The wife of 31st president, Herbert Hoover, Lou served as first lady during the first years of the Great Depression. Did you know? A geology major while at university, Lou had a love of nature and the outdoors and was a strong […]

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President John Tyler birthday

  Today marks the birthday of the 10th president John Tyler. Did you know that Tyler was the first vice-president to take office after the death of a sitting president? He became president after the death of William Henry Harrison, who held the shortest term in U.S. history. He is also known as the only […]

Arizona State University: Lessons Learned and Tough Choices in Public Leadership

On March 29, 2022, the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership at Arizona State University, a JMC partner program, hosted Heather Wilson, the president of University of Texas at El Paso, former secretary of the U.S. Air Force and former New Mexico’s representative in Congress, to share some of the tough lessons she […]

City College of New York: From Theory to Practice – Discussing Danielle Allen’s Run for Governor of Massachusetts

The Colin Powell School at the City College of New York held a virtual discussion with Ryan Balot, Susan McWilliams Barndt (JMC faculty partner), Jamelle Bouie, Simone Chambers, Roosevelt Montás (JMC faculty partner), and Deva Woodly on Professor Danielle Allen's run for governor of Massachusetts: How can Danielle Allen’s scholarship and ongoing political campaign shape […]

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Daylight Saving Time goes into effect for the first time

On March 31, 1918, Daylight Saving Time went into effect for the first time in the United States. The practice had roots in World War I, when clocks were changed by an hour to conserve on fuel. After the war however, the practice proved so unpopular with Americans that it was repealed in 1919. Daylight […]

SUNY-Geneseo: Against Sophisticated Cynicism – Socrates’ Philosophic Defense of Morality

On March 31, 2022, the Forum on Constitutionalism and Democracy at SUNY-Geneseo held  a virtual discussion with fellow Gregory McBrayer on modern day morality and what Plato can teach us about solving our own moral and political questions: How can a society revive justice when its moral foundations have been shaken by cynicism, sophistry, and […]

University of North Texas: Frederick Douglass’s America

On March 31, 2022, the University of North Texas's Constitutionalism and Democracy Forum hosted JMC faculty partner Diana Schaub for a public lecture on her research on Frederick Douglass. Thursday, March 31, 2022 • 4:00 PM CDT Willis Library, 250 H • University of North Texas Click here to learn more >>     Diana […]

Ave Maria University: After Nationalism – Being an American in an Age of Division

On March 31, 2022, the Politics Department at Ave Maria University hosted fellow Samuel Goldman for a talk on his recent book, After Nationalism: Being American in an Age of Division. The talk will discuss the three kinds of nationalism Americans have attempted to forge and why they never quite served the purpose for national […]

Jacksonville State University: Joseph Knippenberg on “Forgetting or Denying ‘The Good, the True, and the Beautiful'”

The Tocqueville Lecture Series at Jacksonville State University, a JMC partner program, held a virtual presentation and Q&A with faculty partner Joseph Knippenberg: In this lecture, Dr. Knippenberg will discuss the two most prominent contemporary challenges to the liberal education that should be at the core of everyone’s experience of higher education. Both challenges are […]

Harvard: His Greatest Speeches – How Lincoln Moved the Nation

On April 1, 2022, Harvard University's Program on Constitutional Government will host JMC faculty partner Diana Schaub for a public virtual lecture on Lincoln's greatest speeches. Friday, April 1, 2022 • 12:30 PM EDT Harvard University Free and open to the public. Click here to register >>     Diana Schaub is a Professor of […]

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The Pony Express begins

On April 3, 1860, the first rider for the Pony Express departed St. Joseph, Missouri. Each of the famed riders rode 75-100 miles straight, handing off letters to another waiting […]

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Establishment of the Civilian Conservation Corps

On this day in 1933, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was established to organize young, unemployed American men to work on America’s parks and forests. In addition to providing jobs for the unemployed, the program led to a greater appreciation and awareness of America’s wilderness. ⁠ ⁠ Did you know that over the course of […]

University of Oklahoma: National and State Authority under the Constitution

On April 6, 2022, the University of Oklahoma's Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage will host Max Edling for a talk based on his recent book, Perfecting the Union: National and State Authority in the United States. Wednesday, April 6, 2022 University of Oklahoma Click here to learn more >>     Max Edling is […]

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National Beer Day

It’s National Beer Day! 🍺🍺🍺 So, why today? On April 7, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt partially lifted Prohibition regulations, relegalizing 3.2% beer. It would be another 8 months before […]

University of Portland: The Fourteenth Amendment

On April 7, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Minor at the University of Portland will be hosting Evan Bernick for a lecture on his new book, The Original Meaning of the Fourteenth Amendment: Its Letter and Spirit (Harvard 2021), co-authored with Georgetown law professor Randy E. Barnett. Thursday, April 7, 2022 University of Portland     […]

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On this day in 1918, First Lady Betty Ford born in Chicago, Illinois

On April 8, 1918, First Lady Betty Ford was born in Chicago, Illinois. During her time as First Lady, Ford brought special attention to drug and alcohol addiction, as well as breast cancer awareness. Having faced addiction and breast cancer herself, Ford made the personal public to reduce stigma around these issues. Did you know? […]

Belmont Abbey College: Conference on Alexis de Tocqueville

On April 8-9, 2022, Belmont Abbey Honors College will host a two-day conference, "'Revolution, Religion, Regime Change, and Liberty': A Discussion of Tocqueville’s Other Book: The Old Regime and the Revolution" featuring four small group seminar sessions on selections from Tocqueville’s L’Ancien Regime et La Revolution. Students and faculty from all institutions will be mixed […]

Villanova: Student Conference on Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg, and American Political Thought

On April 8-10, 2022, the Matthew J. Ryan Center at Villanova University will host a three-day student conference, "Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg, and American Political Thought" in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The JMC-sponsored event will give students an opportunity to discuss thinkers and texts tied to America’s founding principles and history that they might not otherwise encounter during […]

SUNY-Geneseo: What We Talk About When We Talk About Political Speech

On April 8, 2022, the Forum on Constitutionalism and Democracy at SUNY-Geneseo will be holding a virtual discussion with faculty partner Alexander Duff on the place of speech in our common life: Contemporary questions about the place of speech in our common life are sometimes articulated as though speech is violence and therefore violence is […]

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Official end of the Civil War

On this day in 1865, the Civil War unofficially ended as General Robert E. Lee surrendered to General Ulysses S. Grant in Appomattox Court House, Virginia. ⁠ ⁠ Did you know?: Lee arrived at the meeting in his full dress uniform, while future president Grant wore his muddy field uniform for the occasion. ⁠Terms of […]

University of Houston: The Humanities, Ethics, and Biotechnology

On April 11, 2022, the University of Houston's Tocqueville Forum on American Ideas and Institutions will host Donald Drakeman to give a talk on his new book, From Breakthrough to Blockbuster: the Business of Biotechnology as part of a broader conference series entitled “Liberal Education and Citizenship in a Self-Governing Republic”. His lecture will showcase the […]

Linfield University: Darius Wallace Performs Frederick Douglass

On April 11, 2022, the Frederick Douglass Forum on Law, Rights, and Justice at Linfield University will be hosting acclaimed stage actor Darius Wallace for his portrayal of Frederick Douglass. Mr. Wallace performs one man shows in which he plays Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King Jr., and many other important figures in black history. […]

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Civil War begins with Battle of Fort Sumter

On April 12, 1861, the Civil War began as Confederate troops under the command of General Pierre Beauregard opened fire on Fort Sumter off the coast of Charleston, South Carolina. South Carolina had declared secession in December 1860 after the election of Abraham Lincoln. Did you know? Amazingly, nobody was killed in the Battle of […]

UC-Berkeley: The Dying Citizen

On April 12, 2022, the Public Law and Policy Program at the University of California, Berkeley will be hosting Victor Davis Hanson for a discussion of his recent book, The Dying Citizen. Tuesday, April 12, 2022 • 5:15 PM PDT Warren Room 295 Simon Hall • University of California-Berkeley Click here to learn more >> […]

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Abraham Lincoln assassinated by John Wilkes Booth

On this day in 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was tragically shot and mortally wounded in Ford’s Theatre while watching a performance of Our American Cousin. After being evaluated by doctors, he was taken across the street from the theater to William Petersen's boarding house.⁠ ⁠ This painting, Lincoln Borne by Loving Hands, is the only […]

Texas State University: Undoing the American Settlement -The Rise and Decline of American Religious Freedom

  On April 14, 2022, Texas State University will be hosting Steven D. Smith for a discussion of American religious liberty. Dr. Smith will explore the traditional understanding of the religious provisions of the First Amendment and the consequences of the Supreme Court’s rejection of that understanding: Situating the roots of America’s approach to the […]

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First Boston Marathon

On this day in 1897, the first Boston Marathon took place. Only 15 runners (all men) took part in the race, with John J. McDermott of New York finishing victorious. The number of participants has grown to roughly 30,000 runners in more recent times.⁠ ⁠ Did you know? Women weren’t allowed to enter the marathon […]

Utah Valley University: Civics & Civility

On April 19, 2022, the Center for Constitutional Studies at Utah Valley University will be hosting Governor Spencer Cox and Christopher Peterson for a public discussion of civility in politics. Two of Utah's most recent gubernatorial candidates, Cox and Peterson will talk about their experience with civility and political campaigns and answer questions from the […]

Middlebury: Triumphs of Public Policy? Revisiting the New Deal and the Great Society

On April 19, 2022, the Alexander Hamilton Forum at Middlebury College will be hosting author Amity Shlaes and former Governor Jim Douglas to discuss the 1920s, the New Deal, and the Great Society: Amity Shlaes is a bestselling author who treats twentieth-century political and economic history. Her biography of Calvin Coolidge, a president who grew up in Plymouth […]

JMC Office Hours: American Foreign Policy and the War in Ukraine

Do you have questions about the war in Ukraine? The response from the international community? Or about what role the United States could play in the conflict? Ask a JMC faculty partner! On Wednesday, April 20th, JMC will host its second Office Hours with Professor Alberto Coll (DePaul University College of Law) where he will […]

University of Nebraska-Omaha: Was John Locke a Libertarian?

On April 21, 2022, the Constitutional Studies Forum at the University of Nebraska-Omaha will be hosting David Azerrad for a public discussion of influential Enlightenment thinker John Locke. Thursday, April 21, 2022 • 10:00 AM CDT CPACS 132 • University of Nebraska-Omaha The event is free and open to the public. Click here to learn […]

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15th President James Buchanan birthday

  On this day in 1791, 15th president James Buchanan was born. The last president born in the 18th century, he served just one term from 1857 to 1861, as the immediate predecessor to Abraham Lincoln. ⁠ ⁠ Though Buchanan aimed to compromise in an increasingly divided nation, he failed to prevent the conflict of […]

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On this day in 1800, the Library of Congress was established

On this day in 1800, the Library of Congress was established in Washington, D.C. It is our nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world! Since 1801, the collection has increased from its initial 740 volumes “necessary for the use of Congress” to over 170 million items. ⁠ ⁠ The Library […]

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On this day in 1785, famed ornithologist John James Audubon born in Haiti

On April 26, 1785 famed ornithologist John James Audubon was born in Les Caves, Saint-Dominique (modern-day Haiti). Audubon documented 700+ birds of America in his book, Birds of America. His faithful paintings of several species are still enjoyed today. 🐦🦆🦉🦅 Did you know? Audubon, though most associated with American wildlife, was not American himself. He […]

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On this day 1788, Maryland was ratified into the United States

On April 28, 1788, 7th state Maryland was ratified into the United States. Did you know? The Maryland State House is the oldest state capitol in continuous legislative use. It also served as the national Capitol when Annapolis was our nation’s capitol – Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the army here. What’s in […]

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On this day in 1812, Louisiana was admitted to the United States

On April 30, 1812, Louisiana was admitted to the United States as our 18th state. Did you know? Perhaps unsurprisingly, Louisiana is the birthplace of jazz. The port city of New Orleans was the perfect melting pot for jazz’s development, as the genre borrows elements of both African and European musical traditions. Jazz developed in […]

On this day in 1864, Nellie Bly was born in Cochran’s Mills, Pennsylvania

On this day in 1864, American journalist Nellie Bly was born in Cochran’s Mills, Pennsylvania. Bly (born Elizabeth Cochran) is famous for her daring approach to investigative journalism, and, in particular, for exposing the poor working and living conditions in urban areas.⁠ ⁠ In 1887, Bly went undercover, feigning insanity in order to be admitted […]

Mary Kies becomes the first woman to receive a U.S. patent

On May 5, 1809, Mary Kies became the first woman to receive a U.S. patent for her new method of weaving straw hats using silk and thread. 👒👒👒 Did you know? First Lady Dolley Madison was so impressed with Kies’ innovation that she wrote to her with congratulations for boosting the female-dominated straw hat-making industry. […]

148th running of the Kentucky Derby

Today marks the 148th running of the Kentucky Derby! The Derby dates to 1875 and of the three races in the Triple Crown, it is the first and the most popular, attracting millions of viewers every year. 🐎 🐎 🐎 Over the years, the race has collected a variety of traditions, including mint juleps, enormous […]

Happy Mother’s Day!

Happy Mother’s Day! 🥰👩‍👧‍👦💐 Did you know? Abigail Adams is one of only two women that have served as both First Lady and mother of a president. She was survived by both of her presidents and left a lasting impact on them with her goodness and intelligent support. Writing in his diary upon her death, […]

American Abolitionist John Brown born in Torrington, Connecticut

On May 9, 1800, American abolitionist John Brown was born in Torrington, Connecticut. He’s best remembered for his forceful means of fighting slavery, in particular the raid he led on Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia in 1859. The raid was meant to incite a nationwide slave rebellion and heightened already rising tensions over slavery between North […]

Middlebury: The Death of the American Dream?

On May 10, 2022, the Alexander Hamilton Forum at Middlebury College will be hosting AEI scholar Michael Strain, who will argue that populism has infused an unwarranted and debilitating pessimism into national economic discourse. Tuesday, May 10, 2022 • 5:00 PM, EDT Dana Auditorium • Middlebury College Click here to learn more >>     […]

Minnesota admitted as 32nd State

On May 11, 1858, Minnesota was admitted into the United States as our 32nd state. Did you know? Minnesota was the first Union state to volunteer troops to fight in the Civil War. Roughly half of Minnesota’s eligible men fought in the war. Minnesota’s nickname, “Land of 10,000 Lakes,” is no exaggeration. In actuality, the […]

The Lewis and Clark expedition begins

On May 14, 1804, the Lewis and Clark expedition began as William Clark departed from Camp Dubois in Illinois to join Meriwether Lewis in St. Charles, Missouri. Over the course of the next two and a half years, the men and their expedition would explore the newly obtained Louisiana Purchase, traveling 8,000+ miles to and […]

On this day in 1860, First Lady Ellen Wilson born in Savannah, Georgia

On May 15, 1860, First Lady Ellen Wilson was born in Savannah, Georgia. First Lady to Woodrow Wilson, she took a particular interest in art and children’s issues. Before marrying, she attended the prestigious Art Students League. 🎨 🖌 Did you know? Wilson directed the addition of the famous Rose Garden to the White House […]

New York Stock Exchange established

On May 17, 1792, the New York Stock Exchange was established as businessmen met under a buttonwood tree on Wall Street and signed a trading agreement to give preference to each other while buying and selling. 💸💸💸 Trading often took place outside (weather-permitting) as well as in nearby taverns and coffeehouses. 🌳☕️🌳 Did you know? […]

On this day In 1954, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka was decided

On this day in 1954, Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka was decided with the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruling that race-based segregation in public schools was unlawful and denied black children equal educational opportunities. The landmark case began as five separate cases drawn from Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia, Delaware, and D.C. At the […]

First Lady Dolley Madison born in Guilford County, North Carolina

On May 20, 1768, First Lady Dolley Madison was born in Guilford County, North Carolina. The wife of founding father James Madison, Dolley balanced his taciturn nature with her sociability, friendliness, and fun-loving tendencies. Their marriage is remembered as a particularly happy one despite their difference in natures and wide age gap of 17 years. […]

Christendom: Machiavelli and His Impact on Modern Politics

On May 20, 2022, the Christendom College will be hosting a lecture on Machiavelli with JMC fellow Joseph Brutto. The lecture will be broadcast online for those who wish to attend virtually: The use of the term Machiavellian has become synonymous with deceit and corruption in politics. But what did Machiavelli actually teach? In this […]

Crater Lake National Park established in Oregon

On May 22, 1902, Crater Lake National Park was established in Oregon. Aside from being jaw-droppingly beautiful, the lake is the deepest in the United States, reaching depths of 1,943 (the ninth deepest in the world). Did you know? Crater Lake was formed by the eruption and collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama 7,700 years […]

World Wrestling Day

May 23 is World Wrestling Day! Several U.S. presidents didn’t just wrestle, but were good at it, including Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Zachary Taylor. Abraham Lincoln was renowned in his region for his wrestling skills, only losing one match in a dozen years. He is the only president to be conducted into the […]

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On this day in 1844, telegraph inventor Samuel Morse sent the first telegraph message from the Capital building in Washington D.C. to Baltimore MD

  On this day in 1844, telegraph inventor Samuel Morse sent the first telegraph message from the Capitol building in Washington, D.C. to Baltimore, MD. 🏛️➡️➡️➡️➡️🏘️ Though now obsolete, the telegraph made a lasting impact on nationwide (and eventually worldwide) communications and was indispensable for war correspondence during the Civil War. ⁠ ⁠ Did you […]

Constitutional Convention begins

On May 25, 1787, the Constitutional Convention began in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Delegates from nearly every state, including George Washington, James Madison, and Benjamin Franklin, met to discuss the future of the United States and a revision of the Articles of Confederation. Over the next few months, the delegates would develop and vote on the U.S. […]

Around this time in 1888, American Athlete Jim Thorpe was born

Around this time in 1888, American athlete Jim Thorpe was born near Prague, Oklahoma, a member of the Sac and Fox Nation. Competing in the 1912 Olympics, he was the first Native American to win a gold medal for the United States. Thorpe was a multi-talented athlete - among other sports he was skilled in […]

First engagement of the French and Indian War

On May 28, 1754, the first engagement of the French and Indian War occurred as a Virginia militia led by 22-year-old George Washington launched a surprise attack on a party of French in southwestern Pennsylvania. 🇬🇧🇫🇷 The skirmish had international implications. Though fighting began in 1754, war wasn’t officially declared between Great Britain and France […]

Rhode Island becomes the 13th State

On May 29, 1790, our 13th state, Rhode Island, was ratified into the United States. Though it was the first colony to renounce allegiance to Great Britain, it was the last of the Thirteen Colonies to ratify the Constitution, and the only state to boycott the Constitutional Convention. Though it is tiny (the smallest state […]

On this day in 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington D.C.

On this day in 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. The structure honors our 16th president and his actions to end slavery and preserve the Union. ⁠ ⁠ The 1922 dedication ceremony was attended by such prominent figures as Robert Lincoln (Lincoln’s only surviving son), past president William Howard Taft, and keynote […]

Memorial Day 2022

Happy Memorial Day from the JMC! While many of us are enjoying a long weekend, let us remember the purpose of this national holiday – to remember and honor those that have fallen while in service to our country. The holiday has origins in the aftermath of the Civil War – "Decoration Day" was celebrated […]

First Lady Helen “Nellie” Taft born in Cincinnati, Ohio

On June 2, 1861, First Lady Helen “Nellie” Taft was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Taft was enthusiastic about music and travel. She had a degree in music from the Cincinnati College of Music and founded the city’s orchestra association. 🎼🎺🎻 Even before her time as First Lady, she had close presidential ties. Taft’s parents were […]

Coastal Carolina: Summer Seminar for Middle and High School Teachers

On June 4-10, 2022, the Cincinnatus Center at Coastal Carolina University will host a week-long summer seminar on the American Political Tradition in June of 2022. This seminar is geared toward middle- and high-school teachers in Horry and surrounding counties, in order to offer content-based professional development to equip teachers with the history and pedagogy […]

First drive-in movie theater opens in Pennsauken, New Jersey

On June 6, 1933, the first drive-in movie theater, Camden Drive-In, opened in Pennsauken, New Jersey. 🎬🎟🚗 Richard Hollingshead, an auto products manager, came up with the idea after witnessing his mother’s discomfort while sitting in the standard movie theater seat. Striking on the comfort of the roomy car seat, he tested the idea in […]

First Lady Ida McKinley born in Canton, Ohio

On June 8, 1847, First Lady Ida McKinley was born in Canton, Ohio. McKinley suffered from many tragedies in her life – aside from her husband’s assassination in 1901, she had previously lost both of her children and suffered from a serious illness that caused debilitating headaches, fainting, and seizures. Before marrying and while healthy, […]

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Revolutionary War patriot Joseph Warren born in Roxbury, Massachusetts

On June 11, 1741, American patriot and physician Joseph Warren was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts. A significant figure in the early days of the Revolutionary War, Dr. Warren led up several patriot organizations in Boston, and was the person that enlisted Paul Revere for his famous midnight ride. Sadly, Warren would never see the fruits […]

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Loving v. Virginia

  On June 12, 1967, the Supreme Court ruled in Loving v. Virginia that the prohibition of interracial marriage was unconstitutional. The case came to the Court after Mildred Jeter (a black woman) and Richard Loving (a white man) were married in Washington, D.C. and returned to Virginia, where they were charged with violating state […]

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Happy Flag Day!

⁠Happy Flag Day! Today marks the  anniversary of the adoption of the American flag. First celebrated locally in northern states during the Civil War, June 14th wasn’t officially established as Flag Day until President Woodrow Wilson made a proclamation in 1916. Although not an official federal holiday, Flag Day is an official state holiday in […]

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Arkansas joins the Union

On June 15, 1836, Arkansas was admitted into the Union as our 25th state. Did you know? Arkansas is the only state with an operating diamond mine. The three largest diamonds found in the United States are from Arkansas. 💎💎💎 Arkansas’s hot springs have long been a destination for people seeking rest and recovery. In […]

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War of 1812 Begins

On June 18, 1812, the War of 1812 began as James Madison signed a declaration of war against Great Britain. The declaration came after British ships attempted to restrict American trade and impressed American sailors into the British Navy. The war was relatively brief, ending in 1815, but had impact as a boost to national […]

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Happy Father’s Day!

Father’s Day was not, as one may imagine, founded by a father, but by a loving daughter, Sonora Smart Dodd. While sitting in at a church service for Mother’s Day, Dodd was inspired to start a day for dads. Her own father, William Smart, was a Civil War veteran who single-handedly raised Dodd and her […]

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Making its Movie Debut: Jaws

On June 20, 1975, Jaws was released in the United States, ushering in the trend of “summer blockbusters.” The famous movie, focused on the hunt for a killer great white shark off the coast of Massachusetts, grossed $7 million in its first weekend (that’s roughly $35 million today!) At the time, it was the highest-grossing […]

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First Day of Summer!

Today marks the first day of summer and is the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. ☀️☀️☀️ Did you know? In the United States, several Native American tribes observed (and still observe) the summer solstice with traditions including dance, prayer, and sun salutation. There are several Native American stone arrangements in the […]

JMC’s 2022 Summer Institute: Science, Political Science, and the American Regime

Summer Institutes are instrumental to building a nationwide community of scholars committed to expanding student access to courses in America’s founding principles. We began in 2007 with 125 faculty partners and today have developed a network of 1,000+ JMC Fellows on over 300 college campuses across the country. Led by renowned scholars, Summer Institutes are […]

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On this day in 1876, the Battle of Little Bighorn took place

On this day in 1876, the Battle of Little Bighorn took place in what is now Montana. Combined Native American forces consisting of Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors soundly defeated General George Armstrong Custer and his men, none of whom survived.⁠ ⁠ The battle, also known as “Custer’s Last Stand,” was one of […]

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On this day – Virginia enters the Union!

On June 25, 1788, Virginia entered the Union as our tenth state. As home to the oldest English settlement in America (Jamestown) as well as several magnanimous founding fathers, Virginia […]

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On this day – Pearl S. Buck was born

Pearl S. Buck On June 26, 1892, American author Pearl S. Buck was born in Hillsboro, West Virginia. She spent much of her life in China and her fiction often focused on Chinese families wrestling with love, adversity, and loss. Her best-selling work, The Good Earth, won the 1938 Nobel Prize in Literature. 📖📚🏅 Did […]

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On this day – Establishment of Federal Holidays

On June 28, 1870, Congress established the first federal holidays. There were only four initially - New Year’s Day, July 4th, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. 🎉🇺🇸🦃🎄Today, there are eleven federal holidays - the most recently established is Juneteenth. The “federal” holiday designation is quite literal – though many businesses follow the federal calendar for days off, […]

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On this day in 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act

On this day in 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal-Aid Highway Act, officially creating the U.S. Interstate Highway System. The new system of highways (41,000 miles in total) greatly improved infrastructure and increased the efficiency of nationwide travel.⁠ ⁠ The project is considered one of the most important achievements of Eisenhower’s presidency. ⁠ […]

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On this day – Mesa Verde National Park Established

On June 29, 1906, Mesa Verde National Park was established in southwestern Colorado to protect a large grouping of ancient cliff dwellings. The dwellings, built by the Ancestral Pueblo, are estimated to be over 700 years old! Aside from being a national park, Mesa Verde is an UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is one of […]

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On this day – 1st Lady Elizabeth Monroe was born

On June 30, 1768, First Lady Elizabeth Monroe was born in New York, New York. While her husband served as minister to France during the French Revolution, Monroe played a critical role in saving the Marquis de Lafayette’s wife from imprisonment. The couple was very popular in France, where Elizabeth was affectionately referred to as […]

On this day – Idaho enters the Union as the 43rd State!

On July 3, 1890, Idaho was admitted into the Union as our 43rd state. A largely rural state with lots of wilderness area, Idaho is known for its potato crop as well as an abundance of gemstones. 72 different types of precious and semi-precious stones are found in the state. 🥔💎🥔💎🥔💎 Did you know? Western […]

Happy Independence Day!

Happy Independence Day! On this day in 1776, our nation was born as the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence. Independence Day has only been a federal holiday since 1941, but July 4th has been celebrated as our country’s birthday since the eighteenth century. 🎆  🇺🇸 🎉⁠ ⁠ Did you know? Fittingly, the […]

On this day – The State’s 1st Patriotic Song hits the Papers

On July 7, 1768, America’s first patriotic song, “Liberty Song,” was published in the Pennsylvania Gazette and Pennsylvania Journal in Philadelphia. Written by founding father John Dickinson, it served as a response to the Townshend Acts of 1767, the most recent in a series of taxes imposed on the colonies by Great Britain. “Liberty Song” […]

On this day – Inventor of the Sewing Machine Born

On July 9, 1819, Elias Howe Jr., the inventor of the modern sewing machine, was born in Spencer, Massachusetts. His patent for the first lockstitch sewing machine contributed much to mass clothing production. 🧵🪡👔👚 Though machine production did not prove profitable for Howe, he became wealthy as other companies utilized his technology, collecting royalties and […]

On this day – Wyoming becomes the 44th State to enter the Union

On July 10, 1890, Wyoming was admitted into the Union as our 44th state. Though it is the most sparsely populated of the 50 states, it has much to offer, with some of the most beautiful wilderness areas in the country, including Yellowstone, the Grand Tetons, and Devil’s Tower. 🌲🦬🌄🏞 Did you know? Wyoming was […]

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On this day – Henry David Thoreau was born

On July 12, 1817, American writer and philosopher Henry David Thoreau was born in Concord, Massachusetts. One of the leading transcendentalists, Thoreau ruminated on nature, justice, and self-perception. His oft-assigned Walden discusses nature and self-reliance while “Civil Disobedience” (in part a response to Thoreau’s disgust with the Mexican-American War) has inspired such leading civil rights […]

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On this day in 1787, Congress adopted the Northwest Ordinance

On this day in 1787, Congress adopted the Northwest Ordinance, which established formal procedures for transitioning American territories into states, encouraged public education, and, perhaps most importantly, banned slavery in the Northwest Territory. Did you know? The Northwest Territory consisted of the current states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin, and parts of Minnesota. Almost […]

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On this day in 1913, 38th president Gerald Ford in Omaha, Nebraska

On this day in 1913, 38th president Gerald Ford was born in Omaha, Nebraska. During his administration, the United States exited the Vietnam War and faced a domestic energy crisis. Ford is remembered as the successor to Richard Nixon, who resigned amidst the Watergate Scandal – Ford controversially pardoned the former president. Did you know? […]

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On this day – George Washington Carver National Monument was created!

On July 14, 1943, the George Washington Carver National Monument was established near Carver’s birthplace of Diamond, Missouri. It was the first national monument dedicated to an African American and non-president and honors Carver’s life and work as an agricultural scientist and inventor. 🥜🥜🥜 Born into slavery near the end of the Civil War, Carver […]

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On this day in 1862, Ida B. Wells was born in Holly Springs, Missouri

On this day in 1862, civil rights and women’s rights activist Ida B. Wells was born in Holly Springs, Missouri. An investigative journalist, she reported on and exposed the violence of lynchings in the South and spoke out against segregation. During this time, Wells received threats to her life and work but did not waver […]

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On this day – Nation’s Capital was founded!

On July 16, 1790, our national capital, Washington, D.C., was founded on the Potomac River as George Washington signed the Residence Act into law. The president was tasked with choosing […]

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On this day in 1902, the first air conditioner was created

On this day in 1902, the first air conditioner was created. Willis Carrier, a young mechanical engineer in Buffalo, New York, invented modern A/C while seeking ways to reduce humidity’s effects on paper. Modern air conditioning came to be used for much more than keeping paper dry. Today, it’s still easy to appreciate the value […]