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Bellarmine University: 2022 Constitution Symposium

February 12

On February 12, 2022, Christopher R. Green, the Jamie L. Whitten Chair in Law and Government at the University of Mississippi School of Law, spoke on “Equal Citizenship, Civil Rights, and the Constitution: The Original Sense of the Privileges or Immunities Clause” drawing upon his book of the same title:

The Privileges or Immunities Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment is arguably the most historically important clause of the most significant part of the U.S. Constitution. Designed to be a central guarantor of civil rights and civil liberties following Reconstruction, this clause could have been at the center of most of the country’s constitutional controversies, not only during Reconstruction, but in the modern period as well; yet for a variety of historical reasons, including precedent-setting narrow interpretations, the Privileges or Immunities Clause has been cast aside by the Supreme Court. This book investigates the Clause in a textualist-originalist manner, an approach increasingly popular among both academics and judges, to examine the meanings actually expressed by the text in its original context.

Saturday, February 12, 2022 • 10:30 AM EST
Cralle Theater, Wyatt Center for the Arts • Bellarmine University

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Christopher R. Green is Professor of Law and Jamie L. Whitten Chair in Law and Government at the University of Mississippi. He is the author of Equal Citizenship, Civil Rights, and the Constitution: The Original Sense of the Privileges or Immunities Clause (Routledge 2015),and the co-author with Scott Gaylord and Lee Strang of the six-volume Federal Constitutional Law textbook series, serving as the chief author of the volumes on the Fourteenth Amendment and on executive power. Professor Green’s publications cover all aspects of Fourteenth Amendment history, including the legitimacy of Reconstruction, the Privileges or Immunities Clause as a requirement of equal civil rights, the Equal Protection Clause as an entitlement to protection from violence, and the Due Process Clause as a guarantee for the rule of law. His articles on constitutional theory have given particular attention to distinctions from philosophy such as the sense-reference distinction, stakes-sensitive epistemology, the semantic conception of truth, indexicals, and the ethics of oath-taking.

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The Constitution Symposium at Bellarmine University is committed to the rational analysis, interpretation, discussion, and debate of American constitutional principles, history, and practice. It is inspired by a vision of citizenship that is both fully dedicated to the American constitutional order and engaged in deliberation about the meaning of American constitutionalism.

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