Notre Dame: How to Think About The Federalist

The Federalist

Constitutional Studies: “How to Think About The Federalist

 

The Constitutional Studies Program at the University of Notre Dame, a JMC partner program, will be hosting JMC partner Charles Kesler for “How to Think About The Federalist,” a lecture on The Federalist Papers.

Thursday, September 12, 2019 • 12:30 PM
Jenkins and Nanovic Halls, Room 1030 • University of Notre Dame

Free and open to the public

Click here for more information >>

 


 

Charles KeslerCharles Kesler is a Senior Fellow of the Claremont Institute, Editor of the Claremont Review of Books, host of Claremont’s The American Mind video series, and the Dengler-Dykema Distinguished Professor of Government at Claremont McKenna College. He also teaches in the Claremont Institute’s Publius Fellows Program and Lincoln Fellows Program. From September 2000 to March 2001, he served as vice chairman of the Advisory Committee to the U.S. Congress’s James Madison Commemoration Commission and he is the recipient of the prestigious 2018 Bradley Prize, a high honor bestowed upon distinguished individuals who have influenced American scholarship and debate. Professor Kesler is the author of I Am the Change: Barack Obama and the Crisis of Liberalism (Broadside Books); the editor of Saving the Revolution: The Federalist Papers and the American Founding (Free Press); co-editor, with John B. Kienker, of Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness: Ten Years of the Claremont Review of Books (Rowman & Littlefield); and co-editor, with William F. Buckley, Jr., of Keeping the Tablets: Modern American Conservative Thought (HarperCollins). He has written extensively on American constitutionalism and political thought, and his edition of The Federalist Papers (Signet Classics) is the best-selling edition in the country.

Professor Kesler is a JMC partner.

Learn more about Charles Kesler >>

 


 

The Constitutional Studies Program, a JMC partner program, is a minor that seeks to educate students on constitutional governments and how they may be used to secure the common good. Thoughtful and educated citizens must possess certain virtues; they must understand and be able to implement, defend, and, if need be, reform constitutional institutions. By creating informed citizens, the program contributes to the University’s mission to pursue truth and to nurture a concern for the common good that will bear fruit as learning becomes service to justice.

Learn more about the Constitutional Studies Program >>

 


 

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